Even for company founder Robert Bosch, using resources sparingly was important, because it saved money and was both ethically and morally correct.

From his earliest years on, he was passionate about flora and fauna, which is why he wanted to protect them. This fundamental characteristic of Robert Bosch had as much to do with the values of his upbringing as with the rural surroundings in which he grew up, and was also a firm element of the world view of the later entrepreneur and his successors.

Draft of a poster encouraging associates to save water, 1973 “The Bärensee* holds 170,000 cubic meters of water. That’s how much Bosch uses in a single month! Don’t waste water.”

Draft of a poster encouraging associates to save water, 1973
“The Bärensee* holds 170,000 cubic meters of water. That’s how much Bosch uses in a single month! Don’t waste water.”

The draft poster from 1973 encouraging associates to save water is just one aspect of this tradition. Two years earlier, the board of management had made environmental protection an official company goal, leading to the introduction of the first environmental guidelines at Bosch on January 1, 1973.

The poster’s design conveys the importance of using resources sparingly, for both economic and ecological reasons. It lets the onlooker know just how essential it is to conserve materials, water, and energy, and is inspired by the importance of recycling materials, treating water in special plants, reusing water, and developing energy-saving products.

Saving ressources has became on of the company’s objectives. Taking water  as an example: From 2007 to 2017, Bosch production facilities worldwide saved 40 percent of water propotional to added value. Read more about sustainability at Bosch here!

 

 

 

 

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